Posted 13 hours ago

mo-mtn-girl:

"My lionfish research is going viral…but my name has been intentionally left out of the stories, replaced by the name of the 12-year-old daughter of my former supervisor’s best friend. The little girl did a science fair project based on my PREVIOUSLY PUBLISHED DISCOVERY of lionfish living in low-salinity estuarine habitats. Her story has been picked up nationally by CBS, NPR, and CORAL magazine, and has received almost 90,000 likes on Facebook, yet my years of groundbreaking work on estuarine lionfish are being completely and intentionally ignored. At this stage in my career, this type of national exposure would be invaluable…if only my name was included in the stories. I feel like my hands are tied. Anything I say will come off as an attempt to steal a little girl’s thunder, but it’s unethical for her and her father to continue to claim the discovery of lionfish in estuaries as her own.

I’m looking towards you - my valued friends and colleagues - for suggestions on how I might be able to remedy this intentional misrepresentation without doing anything to disparage the little girl. Most of you are aware of the massive amount of time I put into exposing kids to science, and I obviously don’t want to do anything to diminish this young lady’s curiosity or enthusiasm. I’m thrilled that she chose to look at lionfish for her science fair project, but encouraging an outright lie is poor parenting and a horrible way to introduce a youngster to a career in the sciences. 

This picture was taken in 2010, when I first discovered lionfish occupying estuarine habitats - 3 years before the little girl’s “discovery” “

-Dr. Zack Jud

I pulled this directly off his Facebook page. 

I will state again that I have nothing against the little girl being so involved and excited by marine biology etc. but it’s appalling that his name isn’t even being mentioned (WAY TO GO SCIENCE JOURNALISTS). 

I don’t think many people realize how valuable this kind of recognition would be for someone who just graduated. 

To look at more of his work that pre-dates the “breakthrough discovery” of the kid go HERE

Please spread. Get this guy the recognition he deserves. 

Posted 13 hours ago
I’m just going to leave this here.

I’m just going to leave this here.

Posted 14 hours ago

My flight to France is in just over two months, and it’s time to start thinking about my packing list! What do you recommend I take for a six month stay en France? Camera? Journal? Wellies?

Posted 15 hours ago

heythereuniverse:

The Great Dying: Explosive Microbial Growth Caused Earth’s Greatest Extinction Event | The Daily Galaxy

The physical environment can produce sudden shocks to the life of our planet through impacting space rocks, erupting volcanoes and other events. But sometimes life itself turns the tables and strikes a swift blow back to the environment. MIT researchers have identified a different culprit — one coming from biology rather than geology. They argue that the carbon disruption and, consequently, the end-Permian extinction were set off by a particular microorganism that evolved a new way to digest organic material into methane.

The end-Permian (or PT) extinction event occurred 252 million years ago. It is often called the Great Dying because around 90 percent of marine species disappeared in one fell swoop. Similar numbers died on land as well, producing a stark contrast between Permian rock layers beneath (or before) the extinction and the Triassic layers above. Extinctions are common throughout time, but for this one, the fossil record truly skipped a beat.

"The end-Permian is the greatest extinction event that we know of," said Daniel Rothman, a geophysicist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. “The changes in the fossil record were obvious even to 19th Century geologists.”

[Link to the original paper]

[Read more]

[Photo 1 Credit[Photo 2 Credit]

In case anyone was wondering why microbes are simply the coolest thing ever, here you go.

Posted 16 hours ago

Yesterday, a teacher at my daughter’s preschool told me that she saw two boys and a girl spinning the knobs of a play oven. Boy #1 says: “I’m a pilot! I’m flying a plane.’ Boy #2 says: “Me too!” The girl is quiet, so the teacher says to her: “What about you, are you a pilot?” The 3 year old girl replies: “I can’t be a pilot. I’m a pilot’s wife.”

So what do you think has happened in this little girl’s short life to make her believe it’s more likely that she would be a pilot’s wife than a pilot?

Posted 18 hours ago
  1. NASA: provides troves of data about the moon that couldn't be made up
  2. NASA: provides images of it used by technologies that were just being made at the time
  3. NASA: provided thousands of jobs to citizens in the quest to learn about the moon
  4. NASA: uses the very real data acquired from its moon missions to further understand moon formations and satellites like it
  5. NASA: dealt with grueling tests, trials and tribulations to get people on the moon
  6. person:
  7. some conspiracy site you got linked off a youtube vid about aliens: what if he nasa not went not moon?
  8. person: you have a point, this could have all been staged
Posted 19 hours ago

dogofscience:

“The genetic code is written in an alphabet consisting of only four letters. Each letter is a molecule made of atoms; each word is three letters long. Every living thing is a masterpiece, written by nature and edited by evolution.”

-Neil DeGrasse Tyson, Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey

Posted 1 day ago

A different story

gradnessmadness:

It’s a cliche, but the journey is different for everyone.

My grad program was designed to take four years to complete - three years of coursework, and a year to write the dissertation.  Bing, bam, boom, you’re done.  Out of my cohort of nine, it happened that way for … exactly one person.

We did have one over-achiever, a woman who finished everything, including writing and defending her dissertation, in three years.  But here comes the journey part: she had her reasons.  She was a newlywed, her husband had given up his job to move to Boondocks University town, and they had agreed that she would honor that sacrifice by getting them out of there as soon as possible.

The person who finished “on time” was an international student whose visa wouldn’t permit her to stay longer.

The rest of us took a variety of paths.  Some took a job at the end of that fourth year, and started working ABD.  Most have since finished their dissertations, but several have not.  Others stayed in Boondocks for a fifth year, extending their assistantship, taking an adjunct gig, or living off savings.  Some got jobs during their first foray into the job market, some of us (including me) took two seasons on the market, and some are still unemployed.

In the midst of all this, there have been marriages, divorces, babies, illness, deaths in the family, and financial hardships.  If I wrote the story of each of my cohort-mates, you’d have nine very different tales.

Sure, there’s a model, an ideal - in and out in four years.  Three years of coursework, one year of writing the diss while looking for a job, getting the job, defending the diss, leaving Boondocks University with diploma in hand.  And everyone who starts the program seems to think that’s the map of the journey.  We don’t anticipate any detours or potholes along the way.

In the end, the map doesn’t match the reality.  Life happens.  And we needn’t feel guilty about writing a different story.

- Flynn

I needed this today. 

I’m feeling relieved about choosing to postpone my defense until after I return from France, but I also have that tiny twinge of guilt for not just finishing the damn thing when I was given the chance (even if finishing might have jeopardized the Fulbright). Other people I started the program with are finishing up and I feel behind, just a little. But my life is not their life.

Posted 1 day ago

ask-an-mra-anything:

sure we’ve never had a woman president, the majority of politicians and CEOs are men, a woman needs a masters degree just to make the same money as a man with a BA doing the same job, rape cases are grossly under prosecuted, and we teach young girls that they’re “asking for” rape based on what they’re wearing

but let’s talk about the REAL issues like how some woman on the internet is selling a coffee mug with the words “male tears” printed on it

Posted 2 days ago